Delaylines
Delaylines


General Photonics phase shifter produces phase shifts up to 15 pi at modulation frequencies from DC to 20 kHz.

Winding a large fiber spool is easy, but making compact, low loss fiber coils requires attention, precision, and skill.

General Photonics’ motorized variable optical delay line provides low cost, precision optical path length adjustment and delay scanning functionality. This addition to the MDL product line is specifically designed for OEM applications that require continuous scanning capability and a small footprint.

GPCs' motorized variable optical delay line provides precision optical path length adjustment of up to 560 ps, single-pass. Driven by a DC motor with an integrated encoder, the MDL-002 has a resolution of less than 0.3μm (1 fs).

Generating programmable time delay from nanoseconds to milliseconds is important for various applications ranging from data center testing to wireless communications to radar, optical communications, and measurement systems.
The VDL-002 is a miniaturized variable optical delay line designed specifically for OEM applications. With a delay range of up to 250 ps, this device is a superior replacement for the variable RF phase shifters inadequately adapted from the RF/wireless field for fiber optic communications.

GPC-FPS-002

GPCs’ 2nd generation all fiber phase shifter/modulator provides phase shifts up to 65π with a much lower half-wave voltage (~2 volts as compared with 10-20 volts for the 1st generation phase shifter) at frequencies from DC to 20 kHz

GPC-FPS-003

The FPS-003 all fiber phase shifter/modulator combines a wide modulation bandwidth (up to 60 kHz) with low half-wave voltages to create a long-range device that can be driven by standard function generators.

A suite of advanced polarization test instruments specially designed for testing the quality of fiber coils ensures the consistent production of high performance coils. GPCs' PM coils can be wound with different winding patterns such as quadrupole, octupole, or other types to minimize the Shupe effect, which degrades the performance of a fiber gyro under temperature-varying conditions.